“Angels We Have Heard On High” Christmas Devotional

Aaron WaidBlog

Christmas, Christian, Devotion

December 6

“Angels We Have Heard On High”

Angels we have heard on high

Sweetly singing o’er the plains

And the mountains in reply

Echoing their joyous strains

Shepherds why this jubilee

Why your joyous strains prolong

What the gladsome tidings be

Which inspire your heavenly song

Glo-ria, in excelsis Deo

Glo-ria(in excelsis in excelsis in excelsis Deo)

In excelsis Deo

See Him in the manger lay

Whom the choir of angels praise

Mary Joseph lend your aid

While our hearts in love we raise

Glo-ria(in excelsis in excelsis in excelsis Deo)

In excelsis Deo

Glo-ria(in excelsis in excelsis in excelsis Deo)

In excelsis Deo

Come adore on bended knee

Christ the Lord the newborn King

Come adore on bended knee

Christ the Lord newborn King

(The newborn, newborn King)

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 Today’s Devotion

When the angel appeared to Mary in Luke 1:30, its first words to her are, “Do not be afraid, Mary; you have found favor with God.”

Do not be afraid…

An angel is depicted appearing to Joseph in Matthew 19-25, encouraging him to not be afraid to marry Mary.

And when the angels appeared to the shepherds in Luke 2:9, and the “glory of God shone around them and they were terrified”… how did the angel comfort them?

“Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great for for all the people.” (Luke 2:10)

As I sit down to write out a few thoughts inspired by “Angels We Have Heard On High,” I would be hypocritical to not first bluntly admit that angels are not a topic that I think about very often. The original Greek from which we derive the word “angel” is angelos, which literally also means “messenger.” True to name, angels are depicted throughout Scripture as messengers of God’s decrees, appearing to provide directives and prophecies to frequently ordinary people, like Mary, Joseph, and shepherds, that would alter the course their lives.

And when God calls upon our lives – when we are challenged to take up the cross of Jesus, abandon the pathways of sin, and embark on a new adventure seeking the Kingdom of Heaven – isn’t fear natural?

Although we may like to think that we would respond to such a divine beckoning with open arms, our natural response is always fear. 

The angels appeared to change lives forever. Neither Mary, Joseph or the shepherds were ever the same. There is much to fear in the unknown, and that’s exactly where God calls us.

But, like the people recorded in Scripture, we too have to wade through the fear, fight off our natural, sin-dictated inclinations, and join in with the heavenly chorus of worship.

God’s way is different than everything we’ve ever known on this Earth. Bigger, bolder, more daring, more audacious. He uses regular people to accomplish the most extraordinary feats in human history.

Can we join with the angels in worship, abandoning our fears and siding with the King’s master plan?

Can we not be afraid?

I pray that each of you will examine closely the places where God is directing you. How is God sending you a message? And just as importantly, how do you intend to respond?

Prayer

God,

It’s not easy to follow you sometimes, particularly when the path that you lead us down is frightening and unknown. We pray that you’ll also strengthen and encourage us to be emboldened in your direction. Thank you for your reliability and knowing that you lead and guide us. Amen.

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Christmas Carols, Christian, Devotions

Aaron Waid

Aaron Waid

Aaron is a husband, father, theologian, writer, instructor, and musician.
Aaron Waid

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